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"Governor Kotek's budget plan is a step in the right direction and begins to address the significant staffing shortages in the State.

Oregon AFSCME Local 328 Settles Historic Contract With OHSU

Contract Includes Massive Investments in Workers

Oregon AFSCME Local

After over 25 months of bargaining, the members of the six unions that make up the District Council of Trade Unions (DCTU) have voted in favor of accepting city management most recent proposal, which calls off a declared strike with just over 24 hours to go.

The agreement includes:

  • A 2% across the board raise on top of COLA in the fourth year of the contract

  • Preservation of essential worker language

State lawmakers must prioritize Oregon’s working families and those left behind during the pandemic. While corporate profits skyrocket, our state has serious issues affecting everyday Oregonians that must be addressed. Every county in the state is a child care desert due to a lack of support for parents and child care providers, especially parents and providers of color. Oregon has the highest rate of addiction in the country because of historic underinvestment in treatment service staffing that has only gotten worse since the pandemic.

Bargaining is around the corner! This is a historic opportunity for us, health care interpreters, to negotiate for fair working conditions with the State of Oregon. Our work has gone unrecognized for far too long, this pandemic has brought even more challenges to our work and while many have left the industry, we also know that Covid-19 has disproportionately impacted the communities we serve. Many of us continue to do this work because we know how critical it is for the thousands of immigrants, refugees and hard-of-hearing patients.

Our nation’s behavioral and mental health workers have helped families and communities deal with every imaginable crisis, including the opioid crisis, gun violence, homelessness and the coronavirus pandemic. But for far too long, their work has not been fully appreciated.

The State of Oregon on April 23 recognized a union for as many as 500 medical interpreters who translate for Medicaid patients who don’t speak English.

Because the interpreters are independent contractors, they wouldn’t normally have a legal process to unionize, except that Oregon AFSCME helped pass a bill in 2019, HB 2231, that made unionization possible. Under the law, interpreters who are hired through a registry maintained by the Oregon Health Authority can unionize.